IT Pros face more barriers going to Mac OS X or Linux than in Vista

November 20, 2007

IT Pros face more barriers going to Mac, Linux than in VistaWhile Microsoft Vista worries lead some IT pros to consider Mac OS X and Linux as alternatives, they will be facing a different kind of technology barrier should they decide to adopt Mac OS X and Linux instead of Vista.

In today’s business operations, most companies have adopted complex technologies to deliver their unique products and services. Their operations often require heterogeneous systems management, which could serve a barrier to going with an operating system other than Microsoft.

In a survey conducted by King Research, and commissioned by systems management vendor Kace, of 961 IT professionals, “almost half of all participants (45%) cited challenges with system management in non-Windows operating systems as preventing them from adopting” alternatives, Network World writes.

Sixty percent of the survey respondents disclosed that they manage their Windows systems with tools not compatible with a non-Windows environment.

Among the challenges cited were the need to learn to use different sets of management tools (50%) and the need to manage multiple and totally different operating systems (49%).

While IT professionals have some issues and concerns in adopting Vista, history speaks that Microsoft has been able to address these technical issues in its service pack releases.

Vista’s SP1 is just around the corner. In fact Microsoft has released Windows Vista SP1 RC Preview to 15,000 testers last week. This is the final step in testing before it will be released for commercial use.

Ultimately, the choices boil down to preparing, waiting and adopting Vista SP1, or stepping up to the challenge of migrating into an alternative operating system environment.

Be Sociable, Share!

7 Responses to “IT Pros face more barriers going to Mac OS X or Linux than in Vista”

  1. Sly Coder:

    Think this through a little bit.

    Users *may* face more hassles migrating to Linux rather than upgrading Vista, but it’s a *once-off* additional burden.

    After that once-off migration, Linux upgrades, usage and cost have a substantial advantage over ongoing Windows upgrades.

  2. MisterMeister:

    “Sixty percent of the survey respondents disclosed that they manage their Windows systems with tools not compatible with non-Windows environment.”

    … and the jump to Vista will allow the continued use of these management tools or does another “upgrade” need to take place raising the TCO even further?

    What about hardware upgrades and compatibility issues with current software? Once again does another “upgrade” need to take place and once again raise the TCO even further?

    Have you ever worked in the IT department of any large company because if you did then you would obviously know about the need to support both legacy applications and equipment. So the off the cuff statement for the need to have a “heterogeneous systems management” is a possible “barrier is just more FUD from another Microsoft shill.

  3. MisterMeister:

    “Sixty percent of the survey respondents disclosed that they manage their Windows systems with tools not compatible with non-Windows environment.”

    … and the jump to Vista will allow the continued use of these management tools or does another “upgrade” need to take place raising the TCO even further?

    What about hardware upgrades and compatibility issues with current software? Once again does another “upgrade” need to take place and once again raise the TCO even further?

    Have you ever worked in the IT department of any large company because if you did then you would obviously know about the need to support both legacy applications and equipment. So the off the cuff statement for the need to have a “heterogeneous systems management” is a possible “barrier” is just more FUD from another Microsoft shill.

  4. Ken:

    I don’t know it’s FUD as much as a lack of knowledge. The majority of IT workers only have a cursory knowledge of anything besides Windows. Using it for networking and servers is the logical first step. The is still no real drop in replacement for Exchange, if it’s being fully utilized.

  5. Lucas:

    Going out of a Technology that “locks” you isn`t really easy nor cheap, but it really worth the price.

    After migrating out of XP and Vista domain, users will have less expenses.

    The problem is that MS just try to make that barriers more expensive after each version. Vista has made this barrier incredibly expensive to the point it`s worth not migrating to Vista and spending time and money to go Linux and Mac so that they don`t “lock” them selfs more than they already are.

    Plus, the user must stay in a platform that expands his horizon instead of “locking” him.

  6. val-gaav:

    Interesting how to same report can be interpreted differently. Here we have ”
    IT Pros face more barriers going to Mac OS X or Linux than in Vista”

    On the other hand here :
    http://www.computerworlduk.com/management/infrastructure/applications/news/index.cfm?newsid=6258
    It’s a lot more in favor of MacOSX and GNU/Linux

  7. val-gaav:

    How about giving a link to the original report :
    http://www.kace.com/pdf/KACE_VistaSurvey.pdf

    also this article is a bit different perspective and based on the same raport:
    http://www.computerworlduk.com/management/infrastructure/applications/news/index.cfm?newsid=6258

    funny thing here we have altering the report in favor of vista, while in fact 90% IT specialist have concerns about Vista and 53% don’t plan any Vista migration…
    44% of companies was thinking about migrating to GNU/Linux or MacOSX, 9% of them is already in this process and 25% is going to do so in a year time …

    why was it not mentioned here ?

Leave a Reply:


Recent stories

Featured stories

Archives

Copyright © 2014 Blorge.com NS